How to get State Government Jobs

Wind power jobs will be and are very popular. These jobs will be popular with both state and federal governments. I think that jobs for Americans will be very popular in the near future, due to the new presidential administration.

Wind power has been used for centuries, but is a relatively new source of electricity generation. Visually identifiable by its characteristic turbines, wind power has been used on a utility scale for only a few decades. Wind-generating capacity in the United States grew 39 percent per year from 2004 to 2009, and is expected to grow more rapidly as demand for renewable energy increases.[1] As the wind energy industry continues to grow, it will provide many opportunities for workers in search of new careers. These careers extend beyond the wind farm: it also takes the efforts of workers in factories and offices to build and operate a turbine. The wind energy industry has experienced rapid growth in the past decade. According to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), in 2000, installed wind energy capacity in the United States was under 3,000 megawatts. It is now over 35,000 megawatts, enough electricity to power approximately 9.7 million homes.[2] And this growth is accelerating. In 2009, 10,010 megawatts of new wind energy capacity was installed, more than in any previous year. As wind energy continues to grow in popularity, the development of American wind farms is expected to increase. Of course, the pace of wind energy development is influenced by current economic conditions. Despite this growth, wind power is only a tiny segment of the national energy market. In 2009, wind energy made up 1.8 percent of U.S. power generation, an increase from 1.3 percent in 2008. However, wind power accounts for about 50 percent of renewable energy, which includes wind, solar, hydroelectric, and geothermal power, as well as energy from biomass and wood or wood-derived products.[3] Some States rely significantly more on wind power to fill their energy needs. For example, in 2009, 19.7 percent of Iowa’s electricity was produced by wind power.[4] Growth in wind power is expected to continue. According to a report by the Department of Energy, it may be feasible for wind power to provide 20 percent of U.S. electricity needs by the year 2030.[5] According to AWEA, an estimated 85,000 Americans are currently employed in the wind power industry and related fields. Many workers are found on wind farms, which are frequently located in the Midwest, Southwest, and Northeast regions of the United States. Texas, Iowa, and California are the leading States in wind power generating capacity, but many other States—including Illinois, Indiana, Oregon, and Washington—are in the process of substantially increasing their wind-generating capacity.

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